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Have i known now what i know that you know.

by | Nov 21, 2022 | Nursing | 0 comments

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Please write a summary of the seminar on the lecture thank you no cover or reference page needed
Melanie Martin
02:57
That right? Looks like we got a small group today. How we doing folks
03:03
looks like I’ve got Barbara and Scott,
03:09
alright, how you doing, Scott. I see you on. Muted yourself.
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Scott Wendricks
03:12
I’m. Greed
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Melanie Martin
03:14
fantastic. Hi, Barbara! How are you,
03:20
Hey, Barbara? Are you able to go ahead and say a quick Hello!
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Barbara Destine
03:30
Good morning! Hi! This is Barbara
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Melanie Martin
03:36
Great! I’m glad you’re able to make it, and looks like we also have Ellie here.
03:41
All right. Hi, Ellie, can you go ahead and say a quick Hello!
03:50
Alright, Looks like Ellie’s maybe getting getting her
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Elli Theodorou
03:53
stuff put together here. Yeah, there she is. Hi! How are you
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Melanie Martin
04:01
good to have you
04:02
all right. So we got a small group, but I think it’s gonna be good, all right.
04:10
So let’s see this week. We get to talk about some developmental theories. All right. So
04:18
um, first of all, how’s everyone doing
04:23
any any kind of issues? Oh, boy, yeah, stay safe. That sounds pretty scary.
04:31
Yeah,
04:32
Hi there, Get
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Barbara Destine
04:36
overwhelmed. Oh, yeah, about the class or about life in general, or about uh the class. The classes really. So Um,
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Elli Theodorou
04:48
I agree with you.
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Melanie Martin
04:50
Okay,
04:52
Is there anything in particular in this one, this class that we’re in today
04:57
that um you find overwhelming?
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Barbara Destine
05:00
Actually. Um, not really. Um.
05:04
It’s it’s mainly.
05:07
I am very in. I am an introvert person, so that’s why I don’t.
05:13
I try it because I don’t want to talk so. Um! It’s
05:20
it’s um! It’s mainly the um
05:23
the work
05:25
that we have to do. I didn’t count it on the work being so
05:29
so much when you had both classes together
05:34
and some of the work on some of the works. Really, I feel I feel that it’s not really needed.
05:40
Um, I spend more time doing the work than studying. Basically So I feel like by the time I’m done with the program, I will end up having to
05:49
um really take some serious classes to try to really understand the um. You know the
05:58
you know, to to really be successful with my test. Basically So um,
06:04
And that’s saddened me because I do have a I i’m already an Mp. I do have an acute care,
06:15
and it was like live that the one that I went to, and it wasn’t so.
06:21
Oh, my goodness! So overwhelmed! I spend days and days and days just doing work, but not really studying.
06:28
So that’s why i’m at right now.
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Melanie Martin
06:31
That’s something that I I wish I could help you with. Um. That might be something that you You can send up the chain, you know. Maybe you know, if you feel like that, that we haven’t
06:45
um unnecessarily difficult workload. Uh, by all means it it, you know. Don’t
06:52
don’t hesitate to
06:53
you know, voice said at the end. Or um, you know, let that be known to people who have a lot more control over
07:02
um
07:04
over the amount of stuff that’s getting taught, because you know that’s something that’s
07:13
that’s something that’s valid. Um if you feel like, you know, you’re you’re struggling to keep up with this, or you know, between all the other classes. It’s just too much. Um! The people want to know this that create the
07:26
the content for these courses. So um, you know there’s not much I can do there. All I can do is support you um with the required
07:37
um. What you know produce requirements on what what needs to happen in order for you to pass. But yeah, I can understand your frustration.
07:46
Um, you know. Uh, if I do have a recommendation. I have noticed this class or this particular course of of students.
07:55
Um! This is a different level of anxiety than I saw the last two courses that I taught. I don’t know if it’s because there is more. I mean, I know that this
08:06
group of students does a
08:09
a chat together,
08:11
and I don’t know if maybe you guys are amping each other up. Um, or if there’s something else going on. But okay, but this level of anxiety? Um.
08:23
You know that i’m seeing by the the amount of emails I’m. Getting from the amount of text messages i’m getting from the amount of people who are
08:32
having a lot of anxiety. I’m not used to this. This is this is next level here, So is it the second cohort, or I? I’m trying to understand getting it from everywhere, I mean, like I’ve I’ve got two uh two groups of students.
08:50
I teach sections, one in sections, two and um, and I definitely. I think you guys are struggling, and I want to know what I can do. I mean the the content is remain the same. I haven’t changed anything, but i’m seeing a lot more um questions and a lot more.
09:09
Um, I’ve had to do a lot more calming down um with this crowd, and I You know I I just I
09:19
I I care about you guys. I really want you to succeed. And
09:25
um not only that, but I want you to be.
09:30
I I don’t want this to be
09:33
a horrible experience for you. I want this to be something that you know you get when you you go through the courses. And yeah, it’s a master’s level. I mean, the the expectation is
09:45
that we have high performing students in the class. And
09:51
um,
09:53
you know that you’re able to make our profession better
10:04
turn to when they really need some emotional support.
10:09
And
10:10
I want you to feel like, you know, when you’re in clinical. You you have the resources emotionally to do that for others. And so you know, if there’s anything I can do on my end. I Unfortunately, I don’t have control over
10:26
the content of the course.
10:29
But if there’s something I can do to,
10:32
you know, reassure you as a group, or just, you know. Share you on um,
10:40
please let me know.
10:47
But that’s where we are, and I don’t think i’m the only one filling that way. No, it’s a lot of problem. Yeah, it feels like. And I do know that a lot of people in this group are taking on a lot they have. They’re not in this only this group, but, like
11:06
the two courses, I’m. Teaching this semester.
11:09
We have a lot of students who are trying to do everything
11:15
and
11:16
that
11:18
that’s not practicing what you’re gonna be preaching. And I mean, this is not specifically to you, Barbara, at all. Please don’t take it that way. But
11:27
you know, when we have people who are
11:29
working and running a household and going to school and doing their clinicals,
11:36
and
11:38
you know they’re not doing any kind of self care. They’re not sleeping right. They’re not exercising. They’re not um doing anything that makes them happy.
11:49
It it takes a toll,
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Barbara Destine
11:51
and it you simply, You don’t have the time. That’s the that’s the issue like. Last night I spent three and a half hours, four hours really trying to set up my oculus um thing, and I started reading the review about it, and then i’m like everybody, is saying how poorly made,
12:11
how horrible it is. But yet i’m like, Oh, my gosh! I’m gonna spend so many hours doing this thing, whereas I could have had. I could have spent time really studying, trying to really out rather like researching, you know, certain
12:27
techniques, you know, or like your class.
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Melanie Martin
12:35
Yeah, I love that. But doing oculus for three four hours getting a grade for it. And then you really you’re just trying to do it to.
12:55
So what I do know is that jumping down those rabbit holes and doing all like reading up on reviews
13:03
that doesn’t help you at all,
13:06
You know. That is only taking away your time from what you could be spending, doing things you actually do like
13:14
and prioritize your your time. You only have a finite amount of time.
13:20
Use it wisely.
13:26
You don’t need to do a perfect job.
13:29
This is going to be you learning priorities as well. So don’t spend too much time on social media. Don’t spend too much time looking up things on the Internet that have zero to do with your priorities. Your priority is to pass the classes, learn the information,
13:48
gain the skills that you can, and one of the skills is prioritization. You all have worked in health here before you all know how this works. You’ve got to triage, and this is you doing your own triaging if you’re getting overwhelmed,
14:05
Are you getting, You know, too too stressed out. Take a look at what you can take out of your out of your time. That’s taking away from
14:15
the things that would help you.
14:18
You’re going to treat yourself the way you’d treat your patients
14:22
because you’re going to have patients coming at you saying these exact same things,
14:27
and it’s going to be your role very soon
14:30
to help them out.
14:32
Take a moment,
14:34
be your own guidance on this one.
14:38
And so that’s the best advice, because you’re going to get some practice.
14:42
Use it,
14:44
Ellie, you are going to say something
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Elli Theodorou
14:47
this. Uh, hi! I had the same thing, the same experience regarding to Akulus. I have No, no, we’re not talking about oculus here. Yes, it is not my class One I let’s bring it to someone else. No, we are not going to talk about this. Okay, and that will see. Oh, yes, i’m going to the second.
15:07
I came to this class to do. The clinicals was supposed to
15:12
for me. I’m talking not for other students to be. It was supposed to be last semester, and the reason was because the clearances was not clear. The doctors in the facility were, i’m sorry, Say that again what was not going on.
15:29
It was the clearance process, it the clearances for the doctor, for the perceptor who stayed in me, and i’m going through that took so long from the Purdue side,
15:47
and for another reasonable, I think, uh which everything it is today computerized
15:57
and was not efficient. And that
16:06
make me so uh, not depressed, but so anxious and frustrated. I know, and I knew I had it all the paperwork,
16:17
and I was stuck.
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Unknown Speaker
16:20
That’s cool,
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Unknown Speaker
16:21
so I guess I probably should have worded this a little bit better, and said,
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Melanie Martin
16:27
Um! Instead of you know what problems and concerns do you have? I should have kept it very specific to things within my power to help you with
16:36
um, and any questions that you have. And i’m sorry you guys had had bad experiences. That’s really unfortunate.
16:45
Um, they’re just some life lessons that need to be learned. Um, but
16:51
but you know I I wish I could help you. I can’t.
16:55
Um. If there’s any questions you have specific to things that I can help you with.
17:02
Um. I’d love to help you out.
17:05
If you don’t have any of those um. Then, you know, we we have some developmental theories to look at. You guys ready for that.
17:15
Let’s do it all right. Okay. So first of all, um what you know. Why do we even have developmental theories,
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Elli Theodorou
17:30
Erics on Freud
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Melanie Martin
17:32
or what? Why do we have them
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Barbara Destine
17:35
to understand better, to promote best practice and to solidify the philosophy of
17:42
why we do what we do.
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Melanie Martin
17:45
Okay,
17:46
yeah, we want to. Basically It’s gonna give us this structure for guidance on how we want it, how we want to approach things, and the developmental ones in particular are going to be aimed at
18:00
how people grow up really right? So we? We’ve already had Freud and Eric Schmidt mentioned. I think that was Barbara. Um, and Yeah. So let’s see. I’m gonna call on first Scott and then get
18:19
to say a little bit about what you remember about either Freud or Erickson.
18:28
Go ahead, Scott, and then getions next.
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Scott Wendricks
18:32
Um,
18:34
I think it had to do with like um, as you said, the development and the maturation as you’re going through the stages. Um, I think it was Erickson where you had the different. Um,
18:49
the sell for the me. Me. Am I close with that the mistrust versus trust and the autonomy and shame initiative and built one
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Melanie Martin
19:00
That’s Eriksen. Yeah. And then the Freud was the you know, the it, the ego super oral anal phallic latency, General: One: Yeah, yeah, I know it. It can be hard to keep them all straight. Um, But yeah, thank you. All right, Gitchens.
19:18
What do you remember about either one of these? And if you don’t, you know if you’re like, hey? I don’t remember anything That’s okay. Just say that
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Gaetjens Joseph
19:30
it’s good money. I’m here.
19:35
Well, we know that Freud was the founder of psychoanalysis. He is very much regarded into that field.
19:44
And uh,
19:48
yeah. So he created those main theories about human behavior.
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Melanie Martin
19:54
Okay, fantastic. Thank you. Yeah. All right. Anything anyone either um anyone else would like to add, or should I just go ahead and fill in on some of the blanks there?
20:05
All right. I’ll go ahead and fill in on the blanks. Um: So yeah, So we have. Freud. Um really did get it all started out right so. And what he did, is he?
20:16
He had a couple of different things going on one. He divided it up by um development like timeframe within.
20:26
You know a human’s life. You start out as a baby and you have the oral face. And so you’re gonna have the mouth and feeding
20:37
is a big focus of stimulation and interaction and it and those are really big deal things. And so it takes place for about the first year of life,
20:48
zero to one.
20:49
Then you also move on and you have the anal phase. So basically one end of the gi track and then the other right.
20:58
So it’s going to be one to three,
21:01
and that’s gonna be in the potty training years. You’re gonna have a lot of elimination toilet training
21:08
um, and
21:11
and that type of thing.
21:13
Um, Then The next up
21:16
is phallic. That’s your your three to six year olds,
21:20
and they, you know the
21:23
genitals. I mean, he’s pretty specific to
21:26
boys. But uh, whatever. Um: So yeah, he says that these are the focus of stimulation. And that’s when they’re You know, kids are learning gender roles,
21:37
and they are learning basically a lot of how to play house, some moral development. Um,
21:45
Those type of things are really central to to the you know, the preschool years.
21:51
Then you have the school years, the the elementary years, the six to twelve.
21:58
And those are um. Basically It’s called the latency period, because
22:04
nothing
22:06
or or
22:08
you know anything genital related is going on. That’s when you’re really spending your energy.
22:16
Having some a lot more activity. You’re very physical. You’re learning a lot. You’re doing a lot of the
22:22
the growth stuff in those periods of time. And then we hit puberty that leads into adulthood, and that’s the genital phase. And That’s where you got the genitals as a focus stimulation.
22:35
Um! And what you’re really looking is mature. Sexual relationships are starting to develop during this time.
22:44
Um, and you know, carrying on um.
22:48
So
22:51
let’s talk just a like, Just briefly, I want these very short, you know. Maybe two sentences tops um
23:00
anyone had or or basically, does anyone have anything they want to chime in on anything there,
23:08
anything they want to say specifically about the oral phase?
23:15
All right? How about about the anal phase.
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Barbara Destine
23:19
Um, I can talk about the oral phase um and um
23:24
the human development.
23:26
It’s basically um the time when the baby is born, and that’s when they have the routing reflexes. And then that’s when they really their sensory is basically
23:38
or role. They identify love with feeding with the maternal breast with, you know, like a pacifier, or this is their pleasure at that time. So
23:53
yeah, so that’s all I can say that I can. Well, I didn’t actually
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Melanie Martin
23:59
want any more than that like we have quite a bit to go through. So it’s kind of nice to keep it sink. Um! Does anyone have anything they want to say about the anal face
24:09
alright, we’re familiar with the phrase and all retentive
24:14
people are all uptight. Yeah, for so that sense from that.
24:19
How about the phallic phase? Three to six,
24:24
All right. Anything anyone wants to say about the latency phase six to twelve year olds.
24:32
Alright? How about the genital phase? The twelve to adulthood?
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Barbara Destine
24:37
Um,
24:39
Dr. Martin,
24:40
the six to twelve year old?
24:43
Well, this is a comment that I have heard from
24:48
one of um a few guys that um. We were friends, and we’re talking, and they were saying that um, I was asking them, How do they identify
24:57
if I you know, What are they going to be? Um,
25:01
I don’t want to offend anybody, so why do they want to be homosexual or heterosexual? I used to think that it’s in the adults and phase, You know that they will identify if they don’t know by the time they are six to twelve they actually in their brain. They decide whether they are going to be one way or another,
25:21
or they they solidify, basically, you know, like they are going to be one way or another, and they are. They are very,
25:29
very into their sex. They are very into touching and feelings and and stuff, and I really didn’t know that it started that early.
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Melanie Martin
25:38
I don’t think it’s exclusive to that age. I think there’s a lot of exploration that’s gonna take place. Um, you know, probably beginning really early, but definitely well into into adulthood as well. Um, I don’t think people are, You know. I I think people are very multiple and definable, and I think, um
25:57
sexuality is.
25:59
It has so many facets to it. I I would be very hesitant to agree that
26:06
um, everyone said in stone by the time they’re
26:10
twelve on what they want to have happen. Um, sexually.
26:14
I think it’s an interesting concept, though I think people are.
26:18
Um, you know It’s it’s good to ask. Possibly. Um, I I think there’s so many factors, and culture is going to be one of them.
26:26
Um, let’s see. And then also the genital phase. Does anyone have anything that like to add to that
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Gaetjens Joseph
26:39
the genital stage? It begins um with the onset of puberty, and it’s around the that period that the teenager they’re trying to seek ways to um satisfy their sexual impulses.
26:57
And um! It it brings the
27:01
the tension
27:02
of that a Dallas and a result in the in the sort of sexual threat.
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Melanie Martin
27:10
Okay, that’s an interesting way of putting it. Thank you.
27:14
And you’ll notice that within each phase you’re going to have different
27:18
different areas of growth, I mean, Who’s
27:21
Has anyone ever had the uh entertaining opportunity to watch a twelve year old try to flirt.
27:31
It’s a very different thing than watching a twenty-two year old. Try to flirt or a thirty-two year old flirt very different games. Um, But yeah, I I think it’s a you know. There’s going to be some development, even within that. And yes, definitely, the onset of puberty
27:47
gets everything going. Thank you. Get
27:50
all right. We also have the it, the ego and the super ego that we could probably address. Um. Has anyone heard of these?
28:02
All right? I’m going to call on Scott. I’m familiar with these ones.
28:09
The ego is the in the super ego.
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Scott Wendricks
28:14
Yeah, yeah, I mean, I can remember a little bit about it from from way far back, I think. Um,
28:22
the it was like the it was more like primitive
28:27
or something pleasure. Yeah, the closure sensors paint. They they don’t want pain just more. The child like stage isn’t it.
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Melanie Martin
28:39
Mhm
28:40
Yeah. And the ego to remember that it’s basically the opposite right. The rational problem, solving one reality, or something like that, like
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Scott Wendricks
28:49
life in general. Or, if I remember
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Melanie Martin
28:52
uh and um the super ego, or you do you remember that one
28:56
Um, I think it’s like living or not like in more like living on or not. It’s not the morals, the ethics, the um, the overseer of making sure that the ego in the it or imbalance.
29:16
Yeah, those ones
29:18
All right. Um, Then we’re gonna move on to Erickson. All right, Ellie. Do you remember him at all?
29:28
Uh, not um. So he kind of took it. He took Freud and he moved it forward. He extended the lifespan a little bit, instead of ending with twelve to adulthood. He takes it all the way up to,
29:44
you know. Retirement, age, or well or early retirement age. Um. So he starts out with
29:51
trust and mistrust, birth to one year old.
29:55
Then he goes on to one to three, and instead of it being all felt like It’s about autonomy versus shame and doubt. And that still adds up to basically the party training years right? Um,
30:08
you know, like when you’re first a baby you’re learning if you
30:13
you know. If you cry, if someone is going to actually take care of you or not.
30:16
Um, but you don’t have a whole lot of control over anything
30:20
as a toddler. You’re starting to have some self control over.
30:26
You know some body functions there.
30:29
Um. Initiative versus guilt.
30:34
That’s gonna be your preschool years. Those are busy, Aren’t. They
30:38
not saying they’re They’re particularly um productive busy, but they’re busy. They’re coloring your
30:45
you know, playing with blocks. You’re doing um, you know, learning how to get along with other kids.
30:53
Industry versus inferiority that’s gonna be your
30:58
your um elementary school years,
31:02
and
31:04
and you’re starting to form a hierarchy within that you know whether it’s getting,
31:10
you know, picked for sports or
31:12
spelling bee champions, or you know anything anything. There’s you’re starting to
31:18
um. You’re productive. You’re learning how to work with others. And you’re You’re really starting to figure out where you sit and your social hierarchy.
31:30
There’s also the um next step the uh. Let’s see.
31:37
Next steps going to be identity versus role confusion. Those are your teenagers. You’re twelve to nineteen.
31:43
Is anyone um in the group
31:47
uh had had teenagers of their own yet.
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Barbara Destine
31:53
Yes, I have three
31:55
right now. Huh! Yes, and you’re surviving. That’s very impressive. Um! I have five children, so I have.
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Melanie Martin
32:05
That’s very impressive within two college age, children. So you’ve been through it. You’re going through it. So tell us what What Um! What are you seeing with teenagers? What are some of the the stages that you’re seeing there with the identity versus role, confusion,
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Barbara Destine
32:24
a a confidence? They are um anything. Um, we have to mine our words as parents
32:32
and um Yes, yes, um. I grew up in the Caribbean. So therefore you know you say to the kids, whatever you want to say, you know, I mean when I was. But
32:44
I realized the damage that I has caused because you basically mold them into.
32:51
Yes, yes, you do. Yes, you do so. So it’s like. Even when they fail. You make sure that you don’t tell them they are a failure that you tell them that this is a an opportunity to learn that
33:05
at least you know that you don’t. You don’t do that anymore, because you know that doesn’t work, you know. So you try to. Oh, you know I turn it around and say that you know i’m sure you’ve got to remember it for the rest of your life, and I make a joke about it. And then I Yeah, you know. But I
33:23
But so that’s what I realized with that. So you need. That’s the time that you really have to make them very confident and be make them believe in themselves and be successful in life. Now, success doesn’t mean that they’re going to be millionaires with money and everything. But be a productive adult in society. So that’s what I’m. That’s all
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Melanie Martin
33:42
goals right there. Just yeah, stay, you know. Just we don’t need to have you go for um, you know, being a the most, you know, accomplished person. Um, that
33:56
you know the next, whatever Elon musk or whatever. Um, yeah, be the best version of yourself that’s exactly it. And yeah, be kind, be, you know, be all the things yeah be encouraged. All the characteristics that
34:10
yeah, you know that I mean, it sounds like you’re doing a really good job. So, huh? Props to you. Yeah, Because anyone else um, you know, I had the chance to work with teenagers, you know, either in their home or outside of their home.
34:30
No, okay. All right. Well, it’s a If anyone remembers being a teenager, it’s it is a pretty confusing time. And you don’t you’re trying basically you’re trying on a bunch of has to see which one you like the best.
34:44
And there’s a lot of trying to figure yourself out. And you know. You ask a teenager what they want to be. And then two weeks later, they tell you they want to be something different, and you just keep on rolling with it, and
34:56
you look back to your own time as a teenager. And you’re like, Yeah,
35:00
this is all age appropriate. Appropriate it. Just Um, it’s a little bit different, being on the other other side of that.
35:08
Um! How about intimacy versus isolation? Those are your early adult years? You’re nineteen to twenty-five.
35:15
Um! That’s about the time people start becoming sexually active. Start having more meaningful um meaningful relationships um
35:27
you know. I think back to that age group, and
35:30
like when I do it when I think back. I remember just wedding after wedding after wedding after wedding, like everybody was getting married.
35:37
That kind of how anybody else remember is that
35:41
Oh, yeah, okay. So and then also um the next up is
35:46
you’re working years you’re twenty-five to fifty. Your adulthood, your generativity versus stagnation.
35:54
And so you’re gonna end up having, you know, these are the times where you’re
35:59
ideally which for most of us it actually didn’t probably work out this way. Um! By the time you hit twenty-five you’re already, you know, settled into your career like your beginning stages, and then you’re just gonna get better and better and better at it.
36:15
And then, by the time you’re fifty, you
36:19
a master at your craft, whatever that would be,
36:23
and then, when you’re fifty, he says you hop into the ego integrity versus to spare,
36:29
and that’s your fifty and older,
36:32
and
36:33
although fifty seems very arbitrary,
36:37
Um, I think I’ve had more fifty year old. Male patients commit suicide or die by suicide than I have any other demographic
36:47
Um. They’re going into the despair phase versus ego integrity. And so, even though we’re expecting people to work well into their sixties,
36:57
there’s something about fifty where
36:59
people
37:01
take stock of their life, look through it and
user avatar
Barbara Destine
37:05
and judge it. Yeah, it it it it it’s regret, it’s it’s a me. So opportunities i’m. Speaking for myself, it’s regret it’s me so opportunities. And how can I be so dumb, and stop it to
37:23
do that? You know you know it. It’s the same saying that you know. Have I known now what I know that you know. That’s the time. But exactly. But you missed that, and you cannot wind it back. You can’t go back and change, you know. So
user avatar
Melanie Martin
37:41
hindsight’s twenty twenty isn’t it?
user avatar
Gaetjens Joseph
37:44
Yes, I was gonna say that. Um, yes, uh like Bubble was saying. This is the time when you’re looking at your life. And you’re like all these miss opportunities, and you’re thinking,
37:58
um how productive you have been. Are you feeling guilty about your past and what you have accomplished with the life goals that you had and some people become. They they become dissatisfied. And um they they develop a sort of um despair, and
38:16
that can definitely lead into um
38:19
uh depression, um
38:21
hopelessness, and so forth.
user avatar
Melanie Martin
38:24
Absolutely it. You know it. It can be hard to take take a good. So of look at yourself. We’ve all made mistakes. We’ve all made decisions for,
38:36
you know. If we could do it all over again, would we try it a different pathway, maybe.
38:43
Yeah, huh?
38:45
And you know um some. Sometimes you take a look at some of the
38:50
people you’ve invested your time and effort and the motion in, and
38:54
that was
38:57
uh that decision one way or another, or people of time, Dr. Martin, you can see it go waste of time. Well, if I already told you some of my relationships or what it’s getting. Um. But yeah, no one hundred percent. Yeah, we we all have. You know whether it’s um,
39:16
you know romantic relationships or friendships that didn’t go well, or jobs that you
39:22
put so so so much into, and you didn’t get the recognition that you felt like you deserved, or um, you know there’s There’s a lot of ways where
39:33
you look back, and you think, hey? I could have made some different choices, and it is hard.
39:38
Um, and
39:40
sometimes just simply
39:43
not getting into a despair. Cycle can be
39:47
a challenge. But
39:50
ego integrity.
39:52
Um,
39:56
yeah, I think there are definitely times where each of us can look back and think. Hey, There might have been a breach of the integrity of
40:03
what I you know who I want to be. I consider myself
40:08
all right. We’re going to move right on another. Theorist is Pavlov.
40:13
Um. So he’s a lot more about basic learning. This is not the higher learning. This is the very, very basic stuff.
40:22
This is His thing is all about the conditioned response and behaviors. Um, just more the involuntary
40:31
reflexes surrounding something. Now I know this seems
40:36
so. Um
40:39
almost.
40:41
Hmm. Let’s see what’s the word i’m looking for. It seems more like veterinary medicine. Whenever I think of padlock, cause I always think of Pablovin’s dog right. He rings a bell, gives the dog some food, and
40:55
and then the dog ends up coming on over, and then he keeps doing that. And then he noticed, Hey! Even when I ring the bell, even if there isn’t any food, my dog salivating, and it was a, you know, measurable
41:11
um
41:12
change in his body, based off of behaviors or based off of, you know.
41:17
Um! His behavior caused something else. And you know the reaction in the dog
41:28
very reflexive. Um there. And so, you know, I know, like it wasn’t really, until I started practicing
41:36
that I recognize.
41:38
Wow! This conditioned response is
41:43
huge because you’re going to see this
41:47
all the time with your patience. Um, especially the
41:54
the ones who have gone through some trauma.
41:57
You’ll see a lot of people get triggered, or you’ll hear about a lot of people getting triggered,
42:01
and
42:03
you gotta recognize just how
42:07
fundamental this is to animal behavior. And at the end of the day we’re human animals, and so um,
42:17
so there are ways to modify um behavior. So, Pablo, I just recognize hey,
42:23
their reactionary behaviors.
42:25
Um, one thing happens, and then this happens as a as a response.
42:32
Um! And then, Skinner,
42:34
he went on to
42:37
see how we can modify this. It’s like, Hey, If this is going to work, let’s use it to our advantage,
42:43
and his is kind of interesting. So Pad will have used dogs. Does anyone remember what Skinner used, or what Skinner’s famous for
42:51
what animal
42:55
pigeons?
42:56
Oh, yeah, hi, Barbara, You’re going to say pigeons when you know.
43:00
Yeah, I said it right as I saw your microphone come up. Sorry i’d be you to um.
43:09
But yeah, uh, so what he was able to do is work a lot with positive reinforcement,
43:17
and he was able to recognize that, Hey, if you give
43:23
a little bit of food to a pigeon. It’s gonna want to repeat a behavior,
43:27
and that’s
43:29
that’s pretty good at carrying over into
43:32
to everyone Else’s life, too, right? So you can end up having some positive reinforcement.
43:38
Um! And then I don’t remember the skin or somebody else. But every time that you know they also got, there’s a a
43:47
a study that involved rats and punishment. So yeah, the pigeons were lucky, and they got the food like the rats of the sky got the food. The rats in the maze didn’t. So there was a thing where every time
43:59
they’d make a a a sound that there’d be a little shock wave that would get jolted into the rats. And so they learned how like I was just kind of sad like that every time that
44:12
make it sound route flinch, cause you know it’d get a shot,
44:17
and then they recognize the like. These Reds
44:21
had some pretty crappy like just shrinking away behavior all you know every time they do it, and
44:27
i’m not the biggest fan of rats. But I also think, yeah, there’s limits to
44:34
what we want to do to any living thing, you know, like um. So yeah, they can. You know you can condition one way or another. You can condition for fear you can condition for um hope, you know. Reward um, and
44:52
and you, you know you can use these to your advantage. And I think
44:56
parents are really excellent. It
44:59
getting, you know, doing these um by and larger. A lot of parents really
45:03
work on
45:05
getting these conditioning
45:08
steps in place so they can
45:11
help their kids become the people. They want them to be.
45:15
Um. Sometimes we do have a a tendency to over correct
45:19
um.
45:21
And
45:23
so, you know, try to be pretty consistent. Um.
45:28
And yeah, we’re gonna do that.
45:31
Another thing that we want to look at is um
45:36
some
45:37
i’m looking through these. Oh,
45:41
um! Does anyone remember Piaget at all,
45:48
all right. Well, Peter J. Was the person that worked on cognitive development,
45:54
and he, he said, You know It’s basically that how we learn in different stages we’ll end up having different learning,
46:03
like their minds, are going to be at different places, and this makes total sense given that our brains don’t even fully developed until we’re about twenty-five. You know we’re looking in the mid twenties for this um
46:17
and Then it seems like things kind of solidify around age thirty. Um! That’s why the American Psychological Association says that you’re not really an adult until you’re thirty, because you you not only your brain, but also your bait or
46:32
um has had a chance to
46:35
to formulate a little better.
46:37
So with. He says that it ages zero to two.
46:42
You are just straight up learning about the world around you. It’s brand new to you.
46:48
So you’re gonna be um. You’re gonna use your senses a lot. You’re just, you know You’re just barely learning how to move. Get around on your own, or even just like little, you know, like on like babies, They’re learning how to,
47:03
you know, Grab a rattle and make it
47:05
make some sound and fill the the
47:09
you know the texture of the rattle on their hand and wave it in front of their face to see how it works. And
47:16
so it’s all going to be about cents and motor,
47:21
and then you have
47:23
two to seven. So a little kid age,
47:27
and they
47:30
there
47:31
Pretty egocentric right, you know. That’s the stage where anything happens, and I think it has to do with them.
47:39
Um! And no, it’s not necessarily the way it works. They’re starting to be able to think symbolically.
47:48
Um, but not
47:51
not They’re still learning
47:54
um concrete operation. That’s gonna be your. You know your other elementary school years seven to eleven,
48:02
and you’re able to do some more.
48:05
It says, manipulate logical relationships
48:09
among concepts, but not only by generalizing from concrete experiences. So it’s one of those things where you’re able to
48:17
to think things out
48:19
on a little bit higher level. You don’t have to
48:22
um see
48:25
two sticks and five sticks to make seven sticks. You can think
48:30
two of something and five of something make seven of something.
48:37
Um.
48:38
I remember this um when when I was
48:44
back in college like this is like the late nineties like a long time ago, but it stuck with me. Um, we’re
48:51
we had um one of my Well, I had a psychology teacher that was teaching this, and she brought in some two things a Plato
49:01
and she their brand. Now she took each of them out of the container, and she said, Okay, what is which is bigger? The pink one or the blue one,
49:13
and we’re like uh it’s the same size, and then she goes. Yep,
49:18
all right. And then she squished one of them super flat,
49:23
and she said, Now which one is bigger,
49:25
or now which one you know, which one is more,
49:28
and we’re like, uh it’s the same, and she’s like, Yeah, but
49:34
watch this, and she put a little video of her kid that very same morning with the same brand new containers of Plato that hadn’t been jacked up or anything yet, and he was, you know, he was like for, and she’s like which one’s bigger and one was like a
49:50
circle, and one was like this flat, squish pancake, and the kids like the one you know, like because it just looked, is it covered more surface area. So
49:59
even though
50:01
yeah, he he just hadn’t quite figured out like
50:04
the same is the same as the same.
50:07
And then the next one is formal operations that’s going to be your eleven to adulthood.
50:13
So your late elementary school all the way up, and you’re able to deal with abstractions.
50:18
You can end up forming hypotheses. You can solve problems in a systematic way.
50:25
And
50:27
um, that’s pretty important, you know, for a kind of the whole rest of your life. Right? Um, because you’re gonna be doing a lot of that.
50:37
So So, um, they’re going to be a few different pro approaches to psychology. There’s going to be one approach to the biological approach.
50:48
Um, So it’s going to be more about the nervous system. The brain hormones that type of thing.
50:55
The other psychology is going to be your evolutionary
50:59
approach where you’re going to be emphasizing the ways in which behavior and mental processes are adapted
51:06
for survival.
51:09
You’re also gonna have the psycho dynamic theories which stress internal conflicts, and a lot of it’s going to be unconscious. Uh. So there’s going to be some aggressive instincts and sexual instincts, and it’s going to be an environmental obstacle. Um! That you’re going to be
51:29
it. It’s You’re gonna end up having kind of more of a
51:35
it. It seems more of a
51:39
aggressive in nature.
51:41
There’s gonna be the behavioral approach that emphasizes learning, especially person’s, experiences with rewards and punishments, you know. So your Skinners, your padlocks
51:54
and also the cognitive one that emphasizes mechanisms for which people receive store, retrieve, and process information.
52:04
Just your learning.
52:07
And
52:08
then there’s going to be a humanistic approach where it’s going to be
52:14
emphasizing the individual potential or the growth and the role of unique perceptions
52:21
and guiding behavior and mental processes. So it’s going to be pretty unique to individuals,
52:26
and
52:28
it’s gonna say a lot of your your own experiences are gonna shape who you become.
52:37
All right, so we can either wrap up now or you. We can get some questions. If anybody has questions or comments, I most certainly welcome those
52:48
anybody anybody.
52:54
All right. Well, I will go ahead and take that as a
52:58
um. You guys had a good experience. You don’t have any questions, and you don’t have any more concerns, and i’ll let you get going
53:07
all right. Well, thank you so much for showing up. Don’t forget to submit um to your
53:13
you know, in the um seminar dropbox that you attended?
53:18
All right, Thanks, everybody. I hope you have a good one.
53:22
Thank you.
user avatar
Barbara Destine
53:26
Bye, bye,

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